CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT

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Journalists for years have been analysing information but they’ve kept it a secret where exactly they are getting this data from and we want to be in on the secret! (side-note. I am aware they do reference where it is from and no cats were injured in this post.)

As public’s, we have a curiosity and a greater need for making our own interpretation and opinions on the information we have presented in front of us.

We want it raw, in all its real beauty. Sometimes merely seeing the data is enough to cure that curiosity. KISS – keep it simple stupid.

For example PR week used infographics to explain ‘influencer marketing’. 

It is great when the work is all done for us, where journalists have already chosen the best and most juicy bits of information from data, but the time has come where we want more. (Of course there is data I’ll never be able to analyse, so yes I will leave that up to the professionals)

See below professionals job to analyse:

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BUT we ‘want an active role in determining its own meaning from the data’. We want to deconstruct and construct the data.

Never fear though journalists, you haven’t lost your role and or responsibility of investigative narrative journalism, we don’t want to kill the journalists job by doing it solo, we do still need the journalist to find or access this data to then present to us, we aren’t the ‘reciprocal participant in the journalistic process’.

Rather the data being there just enhances our understanding and meaning more. It is important that the journalist is able to tell a story through the data. According to an article on Forbes data story telling includes three important aspects: data, visuals and a narrative.

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Feed us things these three aspects and it won’t only explain and engage us but it will also invite us to be enlightened.

 

Better Journalism With Data Visualization

 

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source: gizmodo.com

 

I love reading news online, especially since I don’t subscribe to any newspapers anymore. And over the years, online news have gotten to a level where they create much better narratives than newspaper’s journalism, especially narratives full chock of data based story.

Online journalists nowadays use infographics to help them create better narratives especially ones full of data. Infographic is, by the definition of the internet (and by internet, I mean Wikipedia), is the visual representation of information and data to present information clearly.

A particular reason why I love infographics in any online news story can probably be explained by Segel and Heers’ article. In their article, they mention how visual media can engender a narrative experience to direct our attention to the whole news story.

This is particularly true for me who often gets distracted while reading a news online (which, I assume, happens to everyone as well). Infographics really help me to stick through the whole article, even the long ones. And infographics also help a lot in terms of delivering the story by condensing them into images.

So, whether it’s a story about Elon Musk’s many failures or a brief story about the users and usage of Spotify, infographics have really helped in delivering succinct information to be consumed by our rapidly decreasing attention span.

 

 

 

“Mining through the data: Looking for stories within numbers”

With a plethora of information at our fingertips, it isn’t necessary to have an event happen to have a worthwhile story to tell. Much like man’s evolution, we as journalists have abandoned hunting and gathering data. We have become far more sedentary. So settle down as you can find story ideas via data analysis from the comfort of your own desk! Filtering this flow of data is now the prominent way to investigate current matters. We are digital argriculturists. This change in practices entails a change in skills in order to excel and keep up with the digital revolution. Creating infographics, charts, and visuals is of imperative importance in order for your viewer to understand the story you’ve come to craft with the data analysis you’ve conducted. A great example of job well done is Bloomberg. A notable article is “The Most Dangerous Jobs in America” accessible here: https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-dangerous-jobs/ It turns simple known facts into an interactive serving of a story on the risks associated with your employment in the US. Considering the perpetual flux of information, having vibrant visuals and clear imagery grasps the reader’s attention and delivers research as a narrative form. Finally, what makes this sort of journalism even more effective is that you can quickly share these facts on social networking sites, where your target doesn’t necessary have to plow through a paragraph to pluck out the desired info.