CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT

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Journalists for years have been analysing information but they’ve kept it a secret where exactly they are getting this data from and we want to be in on the secret! (side-note. I am aware they do reference where it is from and no cats were injured in this post.)

As public’s, we have a curiosity and a greater need for making our own interpretation and opinions on the information we have presented in front of us.

We want it raw, in all its real beauty. Sometimes merely seeing the data is enough to cure that curiosity. KISS – keep it simple stupid.

For example PR week used infographics to explain ‘influencer marketing’. 

It is great when the work is all done for us, where journalists have already chosen the best and most juicy bits of information from data, but the time has come where we want more. (Of course there is data I’ll never be able to analyse, so yes I will leave that up to the professionals)

See below professionals job to analyse:

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BUT we ‘want an active role in determining its own meaning from the data’. We want to deconstruct and construct the data.

Never fear though journalists, you haven’t lost your role and or responsibility of investigative narrative journalism, we don’t want to kill the journalists job by doing it solo, we do still need the journalist to find or access this data to then present to us, we aren’t the ‘reciprocal participant in the journalistic process’.

Rather the data being there just enhances our understanding and meaning more. It is important that the journalist is able to tell a story through the data. According to an article on Forbes data story telling includes three important aspects: data, visuals and a narrative.

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Feed us things these three aspects and it won’t only explain and engage us but it will also invite us to be enlightened.

 

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TO INNOVATE; NETWORK.

Innovations don’t happen in isolation. This week I’ve found that social networks are vital to new product development. Organisations must understand the various aspects and or benefits different networks can provide and where they can receive this leverage. Otherwise they’re doomed.

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We know that consumers have twenty-four hour access to their phones, in addition, the Internet and social media. This access allows consumers to easily share information and or opinions to their networks. Market research has found that there are consumers who may be ‘lead users’ as well as ‘crowdsourcing’ groups that are beneficial as their inputs and involvement create greater product prosperity in the development stage. An example of this is Nokia’s Open Innovation Challenge, an international platform that is supported by consumer-generated feedback and comments, on product requests, queries and or suggestions.

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A lead-user would be a person that has a certain level of expertise in the specific area whom I would be more likely to trust and or take opinions from. A lead-user, would have high betweenness centrality to the organisation. Meaning that their level of influence is high and their impact can have both positive or negative effects as they may ‘obstruct, meditate or facilitate knowledge flows from one actor to another’

Lead-users also act as a leverage for organisations, as they indicate and suggest ways that could help them during their product development. Listening and focusing on what they want in a product, could be the very thing that leads the organisation to identify and spark an idea of a new product For example, if lead-users on their blogs, are discussing the benefits of a phone but then state how another brand has a great feature, the company can take this as a lead, and if there is further confirmation and demands for this development, the company can take this feedback and implement changes.

Leads are leading the way, marketers must make sure, they are following that lead.

DO INFLUENCERS REALLY SELL PRODUCTS?

Since Youtube, various other platforms that have emerged have changed the way the market operates and the way organisations markets their products.

Instagram is a mix ‘between user-generated and commercially-produced content’. Starting off as a platform to edit photos to share with families and friends, organisations saw it as an opportunity to keep their audiences up to date with the most current trends and products in a cost efficient way.

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With the edition of Instastories and Live Videos, brands are able to form those intimate relationships with consumers wherever they may be.

While brands have soaked up the opportunities and benefits that Instagram provides, specifically through the use of influencers who demonstrate ‘authenticity and realness’, the questions dooms whether the return on investment into influencers on the Instagram platform, really benefits the organisation? Are there better ways or better platforms for orgnisations to take advantage of?

AdWeek found that Instagram as a platform worked better for certain industries than others and for those specific industries, certain influencers can demand and successfully earn more money for their posts, for example models and fitness are the top two highest reached.

Organisations really have to understand what influencers would be the right for for their brand, and ensure that the level of engagement is worth the amount invested into these influencers. There is companies now that put the right influencer in touch with a brand (what is the world coming to).

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Maximillian Matthews wrote an interesting article about matching the right influencers to the right brands, and the kinds of content that yield real-life influence (consumer or otherwise). His article is a great reminder to sense-check the use of influencer against the objections of a social media strategy and question if they really they do help sell products.

Sure the infamous Steph Claire Smith may get 1000s of thousands of likes, but brands must question whether their target audience are responding to these posts, or is it just 1000s of creepy men double clicking a like?

 

*Week 7

BREAKING NEWS by UGC

Definition User-Generated Content: information submitted by members of the public or posted on social media

BREAKING NEWS – reported from John Smith, Manly

BREAKING NEWS – reported by Stacey Shaw, Armadale

BREAKING NEWS – reported from Benjamin Rodgers, Bondi

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The media landscape is changing. Traditional media may no longer be first on scene and or first to discover the news. Now citizens are at the scene generating images and or updates on news, especially disasters, creating content as it happens. During the London bombing in 2005, it was citizens who helped locate the bombs.

Why is user-generated content becoming one of the most authentic news sources? Because it is in real-time, its one-to-many and then turns into a many-to-many allowing it to spread, be re-shared and used by any one of the public.

This creates blurred lines between the journalist and publics and so it is so important now that journalists engage in digital and operate by ‘digital first’. For those in communication, there isn’t a pinnacle skill level as we have come to learn this semester, that constantly history of the internet and digital are changing and it is up to us to keep up to date on advances being made.

So much UGC is out in the digital world, both content happening in the moment as well as content that is archived. Therefore journalists need a forensic approach, to be able to collate and distinguish which UGC content is reliable, authentic, useable and truthful. Applications such as ‘Twitter Stand’ are just one example of a system that ‘can gather and disseminate breaking news faster than conventional news media’.

UGC is growing at fast rate; being able to gather, analyse and utilise the unique content is a journalistic tool that is essential.

*This was week 8

ENTREPRENEUR OF JOURNALISM #LifeGoals

“When I grow up, I want to be an entrepreneur of journalism.” Tess McPherson

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If this was something that was said ten years ago there would have been faces of disbelief and disgruntled murmurs coming from any journalist working in print as some would and still do argue it goes against the journalists role in a democratic society.

The desired outcome of being an entrepreneur of journalism is to take ownership and earn a profit while they still maintain their journalistic values. This though can come into conflict as the entrepreneur prioritises profit over values.

Change is happening within the education systems around journalism. While universities such as UNSW are still teaching students the traditional functions of journalism, there has been an extension and added value inserted to ensure students maintain and progress with the changing digital and print climate.

Forbes is a prime example of entrepreneurial journalism, similar to the Huffington Post. The site offers a platform for credential experts to help build the brand of Forbes by allowing the content creators to build their own brand by relying on individual’s reputations and ability to create readable content. Forbes provides the reporters tools, training, promoting and marketing support and the contributors provide their expertise. While some are paid, some aren’t. Why are some not paid? They just want to be associated with the Forbes Brand, build themselves a name in the business environment and after time hopefully be able to be their own driver and earn income from it.

Forbes is just one example of Entrepreneurial Journalism, in another ten years, technology will have changed and other forms of journalism will have taken its place.