DO INFLUENCERS REALLY SELL PRODUCTS?

Since Youtube, various other platforms that have emerged have changed the way the market operates and the way organisations markets their products.

Instagram is a mix ‘between user-generated and commercially-produced content’. Starting off as a platform to edit photos to share with families and friends, organisations saw it as an opportunity to keep their audiences up to date with the most current trends and products in a cost efficient way.

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With the edition of Instastories and Live Videos, brands are able to form those intimate relationships with consumers wherever they may be.

While brands have soaked up the opportunities and benefits that Instagram provides, specifically through the use of influencers who demonstrate ‘authenticity and realness’, the questions dooms whether the return on investment into influencers on the Instagram platform, really benefits the organisation? Are there better ways or better platforms for orgnisations to take advantage of?

AdWeek found that Instagram as a platform worked better for certain industries than others and for those specific industries, certain influencers can demand and successfully earn more money for their posts, for example models and fitness are the top two highest reached.

Organisations really have to understand what influencers would be the right for for their brand, and ensure that the level of engagement is worth the amount invested into these influencers. There is companies now that put the right influencer in touch with a brand (what is the world coming to).

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Maximillian Matthews wrote an interesting article about matching the right influencers to the right brands, and the kinds of content that yield real-life influence (consumer or otherwise). His article is a great reminder to sense-check the use of influencer against the objections of a social media strategy and question if they really they do help sell products.

Sure the infamous Steph Claire Smith may get 1000s of thousands of likes, but brands must question whether their target audience are responding to these posts, or is it just 1000s of creepy men double clicking a like?

 

*Week 7

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